Scarface, 1932

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{Theatrical Release Poster}

A man works his way into a leadership role with an organized crime ring in Chicago.

Background: Scarface is based off of the 1929 Ermitage Trail novel of the same name, which is loosely based on the Gangster Al Capone. It was not allowed to be released in 1931, due to censorship issues. It was believed the original version of the film condoned the gangster lifestyle and offered the audience too many inappropriate themes. This film inspired the 1983 version of the film starring Al Pacino.

Synopsis: The bodyguard of a Chicago gang Leader conspires with the gang leader’s 2nd in command Johnny to take out the gang leader allowing for new leadership to take over. Johnny officially take over the gang and makes Tony his second in command. Tony slowly moves up from the braun of Johnny to the brains. Tony helps establish the gang all over Chicago through his violent decisions, and ensures their gang’s bootlegging business is the strongest in the city. Not only does Tony buy himself an iron-walled apartment, and everything he ever dreamed of having,  but he also wins the love of Johnny’s girl Poppy.  After a betrayal by Johnny, Tony becomes the leader of the gang. Tony’s world comes crashing down faster than it took to rise to the top. Not only does he lose his friends, his sister, and Poppy, but he also loses his own life.

My thoughts:This film is interesting from  beginning to end. It has it comedic moments, but also realism that holds up today, despite being a gangster film noir. The characters and the actor portrayals make Scarface special.

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